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20110701
20110731
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >>> in afghanistan, the powerful half brother of afghan president hamid karzai was assassinated today at his home in the southern city of kandahar. officials say he was killed by a trusted guard. the suspect was then killed by other guards. the taliban says the shooter was working for them. ahmed wali karzai was accused by the u.s. and local afghans of being involved in the drug trade and other illegal activities. president karzai spoke to reporters about two hours after the shooting, saying only that quote, this is the life of the afghan people, this sorrow is in every afghan home. >>> high above earth, a final walk in space. these are live pictures that we are bringing to all of you. two crew members of the international space station, you see it here, venturing out on the last space walk of nasa's space shuttle era. absolutely breathtaking. the two floated over the yucatan peninsula. take a look at these live pictures. their job today is to recover a broken pump and stow it in the cargo bay of shuttle "atlantis" which docked with the space station on sunday. the space walk was scheduled to las
killed in iraq and afghanistan, all apparently allegedly targets of illegal eav eavesdropping by journalists working for rupert murdoch's international journalist group. dan rivers has details. >> reporter: the phone hacking scandal goes right to the very done of the british establishment with allegations the former prime minister gordon brown and incredibly queen elizabeth herself were both targeted by journalists working for rupert murdoch's news international. highly sensitive contact numbers and itineraries for the queen and senior royals were bought by journalists from "news of the world" from corrupt police officers who were supposed to be guarding her. >> royalty protection officers are in the ultimate position of trust, and if they have handing over information about royal families' movements and telephone numbers, apart from anything else, it's a massive security risk. >> reporter: and then there are serious allegations about hacking of the former prime minister gordon brown, "the guardian" newspaper says brown's personal information including bank accounts and proper
. >> in terms of large operational bases at 9/11, they had afghanistan. to plan, to recruit, to store material, to train, to strategize in safety. today they still have part of afghanistan. they have a big swath of pakistan. they're in yemen. they're in somalia. they're all the way across north africa in a growing movement that's now reaching down into the western part of africa. and so just objectively you really don't need an opinion. you just need to look at the facts, sir. al qaeda is much bigger and much more geographically dispersed than it was at 9/11. >> chad, would you agree with that? and what kind of operations are we talking about in places like algeria and eenggypt compared t what they had in afghanistan when they had the harboring government of the taliban? >> i couldn't agree more with michael. and i'd actually go a step further to say not only is he right that they have now expanded geographically and have multiple launch points for operations but if we step back and look at that map you'll see it lays over very nicely with what we're witnessing with the arab spring. we're also
is meeting with his afghanistan team today what is that about? >> it's the changing of the guard. the beginning of the drawdown this month in afghanistan. he's got the new secretary of defense leon pan net that in the office with him. ryan crocker who was on friday, confirmed as the newest ambassador to afghanistan. new players who are going to help make the decisions that the president is going to be making over the next several months and maybe years, having to do with the numbers of troops in place and the relationship between the united states government and the government of afghanistan. >> all right, tim, good stuff to look forward to today. >>> how would you like to wake up to $11 billion this morning? it happened at a temper overseas. we're talking about ancient buried treasure. find out exactly what was found after this quick break. >>> if you're up this early today, could be your special day. tuesday, july 5th is national workahol workaholics day. 16 minutes after the hour. almost tastes like one of jack's cereals. fiber one. uh, forgot jack's cereal. [ jack ] what's fo
joining you live this morning from new york. let's start with breaking news in afghanistan, the half brother of this country's president was shot in killed in kandahar. ahmed wali karzai owned his own guard, gunned him down in his house while he was entertaining friends. this karzai was a powerful council chief and pretty powerful guy, his name has been linked to drug dealing. one u.s. diplomatic cable turned up on wikileaks, widely known to be corrupt and narcotics trafficker. "every afghan family has suffered. i hope one day these sufferings end." >>> in the u.s. top democrats and republicans plan fill the gaps between spending gaps and other savings that republicans want. long and short of it, no deal yet, just a brick wall. we like jay leno's take on the whole debate. listen. >> i said no. >> i said no first! >> i said no first! >> no, i said no first! >> i said no first! >> question is, which one is the democrat? which one was the republican? president obama even alluded to childhood to describe where this debate stands. >> we might as well do it now, pull off the band-aid, eat
contract in afghanistan that moves more than 70% of the goods and materiel that u.s. troops need at their remote fire bases, moves it all across afghanistan. the military in kabul looked at this $2 billion plus contract and found payoffs and corruption. one u.s. official telling us, and we quote from what he explained to us, that when they looked at it there were concerns about, quote, fraudulent paperwork and behavior, indications dollars were flowing to criminals and the enemy. what we are talking about is a web of payoffs. the contractors who run the trucking companies, hire subcontractors, the subcontractors then pay or police and security officials who pay off the taliban or criminals so that their trucks get safe passage across insurgent zones in afghanistan. is it realistic at this point that any of this will ever change. we spoke to a top analyst about this. >> when you have the, you know, extent of corruption that we may have seen with some of these contracts, that's clearly not acceptable and they have to change the way they are doing business, but, you know, like i sai
" run we hit the -- at the same time of the russian invasion of afghanistan, which i don't think anybody really completely understood what was going on. i have just read a really, really great book about afghanistan, so forgive me for talk about afghanistan. i've gone off on a tangent. >> another time. >> suddenly people started talking about politics again. they said, maybe paralleled with what we were trying to say there was an interesting subject. >> how much have the critics gotten to you over the years? >> i don't really care very much if i don't think the critics really understand music. >> somebody that you respect, what is the most hurtful kind of thing they could say that would really get to you? >> i guess somebody who i did respect as a musician said that the score was humdrum or something, then i would be sad if i believed in the score. there are always going to be occasions where i think with musical theater, and particularly i think what i do in musical theater, it gets a little bit curious because i fit between sort of two camps. clearly the worst composer in history for "
following a discussion of rockets being fired into afghanistan from across the border in afghanistan. the pakistani government denied responsibility for recent deadly rocket attacks in afghanistan. those are the headlines. i'm monita rajpal in london. "world business today" starts right now. good morning from cnn london. i'm nina dos santos. more advertisers consider pulling the plug as britain's tabloids is hacked. >>> and touching a raw nerve. we'll tell you why japan's meat eating carnival girls have a beef with the boys. >>> first up, though, let's take a look at the markets. it's been a mixed day for asia's stock markets. banking stocks sunk in china. here in europe we had a down beat start to the day. european stock markets have been open for slightly more than an hour at the moment, and as you can see, most of them firmly stuck in the red at the moment. >>> and let's have a look at the currencies because on the currencies front the euro is down by three-tenths of one u.s. dollar. a little under 81 as you can see at the moment. 80.80 is where we stand. in asia it was a mixed da
americans don't want to hear. billions of dollars in your tax money is being wasted in afghanistan or worse. a new federal audit says that some of that cash may be funding, are you ready for this? the same insurgency that is killing americans. chris lawrence is at the pentagon. chris, give us the details. >> reporter: they are not good, kyra. this audit by the inspector general shows that ten years into this war, the u.s. only has limited visibility over billions of dollars once we send it to afghanistan. what that does is it leaves the money vulnerable to fraud and even worse, quote, being diverted to insurgents. how much money are we talking about here? the u.s. has spent about $70 billion in afghanistan security and development projects and the audit shows that as much as $10 million every day, maybe smuggled out of afghanistan. how does that happen? well, when afghan government officials leech the country, no one is checking how much cash they are carrying with them. and the audit shows that afghan officials have no intention at all of scanning their cash through those electronic curren
of soldiers killed in iraq and afghanistan. revelations have made waves across the u.k. and even led to a debate in parliament. and definitely in that debate, i think it's fair to say that the prime minister at times looked very much to be on the back foot. >> he seemed to be. very close with the former editor of "the news of the world." shareholders also getting out of the paper's parent company, which is newscorp. its stock price fell 5% on wednesday. did pull back as you see there. but ended the day down more than 3.5%. investors voting with their feet, as well, charles. >> it's fascinating to see the business world and the political world really moving together on this. and as members of parliament here in the u.k. agree to launch a public inquiry into "the news of the world" alleged hacking, showing prime minister david cameron, and the culture secretary on either side of rupert murdoch. the pressure is rising on the media mogul. it was britain's worst peacetime act of terrorism. but now, there are concerns that families of those killed on 7/7, in 2005, were also eavesdropped up
insurance. >>> can a day pulled the last of its troops out of afghanistan this week. that brings us to our question of the week -- how many nations still have combat troops in afghanistan as part of the international security assist tansz force? is it 6, 16, 26 or 46? stay tuned and we'll tell you the correct answer. make sure you go to cnn.com/gps for ten more question and make sure you check out the global public square don't forget, you can also follow us on twitter and facebook. this week's "book of the week" is the "the last narco." it takes you deep into the life. now that bin laden is dead, this mexican drug kingpin is the number one most ban wanted man in the world, also on "forbes" list of the world's top billionaires. it's a fascinating look at the man. very well written. >>> we often think or politicians are always bickering. it might make you feel better to look at the case of australia, where it seems lawmakers have been literally been fighting like cats and dogs. listen to this. >> if i can finish now. >> why don't you meow when a woman does that. >> yes. what you hear there
. >> there's been a change of u.s. command in afghanistan today as well. general david petraeus leaving to become the cia director handed command of the afghan war to marine general john allen. allen served as a deputy at u.s. central command in tampa before getting that job in afghanistan. >>> in los angeles all back to normal. the 405 traffic was resumed. another typical morning commute. transportation workers closed that busy freeway this weekend to tear down a bridge. that whipped up talk of citywide gridlock, but carmageddon didn't happen. construction crews wrapped up work well before the rush hour deadline. >> i think people are a little spoiled, and they need to realize there's other ways to get around. >> i think it absolutely worked. i wish it could be an ongoing thing. >> thanks, ron. >>> when this flag returns again someday to earth by astronauts that came up on an american spacecraft, it's journey will not end there. the journey will continue. >> a little bit of history in space today. two hours ago astronauts shut the door between "atlantis" and the space station for one l
now. a soldier's death in afghanistan is shrouded in mystery. few details are known, except he was part of the army's secret force. cnn's pentagon correspondent, barbara starr, though with the details. >> reporter: it was here in the mountains of eastern afghanistan that army master sergeant benjamin stevenson was killed on his tenth combat tour of duty. this is the only photo the army will release of the soldier from ft. bragg's army special operations command. the military will say little about his extraordinary record. but cnn has been told by military sources stevenson was a veteran of the army's deeply classified world of special operations forces, highly trained in counterterrorist assault missions, the army equivalent of the navy s.e.a.l.s who killed osama bin laden. on july 21st, stevenson and others helicoptered at night into the mountains. the target, a camp of foreign fighters. the americans quickly came under fire and returned fire, killing nearly 50 insurgents. but at dawn, two more waves of insurgent s attacked. the u.s. repeatedly brought in reinforcements. preci
and afghanistan wars. that is $1 trillion of difference. the boehner plan doesn't consider the winding down of the afghanistan and iraq wars. another thing that is in there that is very different from the democrat and republican ideas is boehner has this balanced budget amendment in there. it is a requirement for both houses to pass it. the democrats say that is ridiculous. the fact of the matter is, a lot of people out there in the country think it is a good idea until they start having to worry about entitlements being cut as a result of it. that is something that the democrats and republicans disagree on. probably the biggest thing is the idea of the two-step process that boehner has. the republicans, i should say the democrats don't like that at all. they have to work that one out. >> joe johns, you are up and at it for us. we have reporters on capitol hill who are checking in with you in d.c. another interesting day. joe, thank you so much. the president has lost some 30,000 supporters in the midst of all of this. the president has urged a compromi compromise. he did it on twitter. he
time of the russian invasion of afghanistan which nobody understood what was going on. i'm going off on a tangent. it changed -- suddenly people started to talk about politics again and said well maybe eva peron and what we were trying to say there was an interesting subject. >> how much did the critics get to you over the years? >> i didn't care very much if i don't think that the critics understand music. >> but somebody you respect, what's the most hurtful kind of thing that they would say that would get to you. >> somebody who i did respect as a musician said that the score was humdrum or something then i would be sad if i believed in the score. there are always going to be occasions where i think with musical theater and particularly what i do in musical theater it gets a little bit curious because i fit between two camps. clearly i would be the worst composer in history for "hair spray." i would be the worse composer for "book of mormon." on the other side i'm more operatic but not that serious. >> broadway is making a lot of money. what's that about? some people say it's link
, mullah omar was dead. we're following the story. we go live to kabul, afghanistan. david, this one has got people wondering. what's going on? >> reporter: well, the news first broke by an afghan television station and then later in the day, cnn and other media received a message by an individual claiming to be a top taliban commander. that individual said that mullah omar had died of heart failure last week and a successor had already been named. the taliban, like you said, later came out and said they have been the victim of a hacking and their phones and emails have been tapped. in fact this message was phoney. cnn doesn't have any confirmation of the sort. we spoke with nato official and they have no operational knowledge on the ground. so the whereabouts of mullah omar are unknown. last believed to be in pakistan, where taliban militants have launched attacks across that border against troops down in the southern region. it's those southern and eastern regions of afghanistan that have experienced some of the highest levels of attacks. and this all comes at a very interesting time.
white house during the wars in afghanistan and iraq, plenty of democrats took principled votes against war funding, whatnot. and there was no chance we would ever cut off funding for the troops on the battlefield. but i don't remember the press indicting those principled stands the way they seem to be indicting republicans taking a stand for smaller government and before we single out for criticism the tea party members of the house republican caucus, they believed they were truly sent there to shrink government and lower taxes. >> listen, i understand all of that, but when you have a deadline. that's what i'm saying. a deadline is a deadline. this show goes on air 8:00 p.m. eastern. i can't keep pushing the thing back. i'm not going to go on the air until i get this. either i do it or i don't when there is a deadline. >> don if you were having your show run by this elements of the tea party, they would be back staij telli stage, no, we think it will be fine, we can put it back until 8:30. there won't be black air on the tv. somehow it will work out. they would say things that are not
an unannounced visit to afghanistan, troops asked him how a u.s. default would affect their paychecks. >> one of the concerns that -- that young men and women expressed to me on this trip is here we are halfway around the world, fighting our country's wars, and i've got to worry about a paycheck potentially on the 15th of august, which is what would be the first payday, if you will, that from my understanding would be in jeopardy if, in fact, we default. >> the soldiers also pressed mullen about the debt debates impact on overall military operations. >>> a u.s. default could certainly hurt world markets. as the u.s. dollar plays a critical role in global economies. joining me right now by phone to discuss the impact of the debt crisis on the asian markets which begin to open in less than three hours from now, pauline chiou. how do you expect the markets may react from the dribblings of a possible deal? >> reporter: yes. dribble, dribble, yeah. we're hanging on to every word of what's coming out of washington. even though it's the early morning hours here in asia. well, fredricka, at this mome
? look at that. a fight erupting in afghanistan's parliament. first, you saw the shoe go flying. then the water bottle goes flying. then punches are thrown. and that's between two female lawmakers before the colleagues finally pulled them apart. now, this followed a discussion about alleged rocket attacks in pakistan. that's something pakistan denies. in montana, the governor declaring a state of emergency in seven counties because of a ruptured pipeline that caused 42,000 gallons of oil to gush into the river last week. governor disagree about how widespread the oil is. the state says it has found oil 90 miles from the leak. now to ohio where a freight train traveling from cleveland to cincinnati leaked more than 1,700 gallons of diesel from its engine before anyone even realized it, crews are scrambling to clean up the mess. they say about 30 of those gallons spiel spiled in s spill when the train stopped on a bridge in downtown columbus. and the dow finishing in the green, up 56 points. let's go to allison kosik live at the stock exchange. i know we're going to get several jo
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)